Are QR Codes Dead?

In today’s ever-changing digital world, there comes a time when we have to evaluate what we’re doing, why we’re doing it, and if it’s time to adapt a process to better suit our needs — or pack up and move on.

Although it’s been 18 years since QR codes were introduced, it wasn’t until more recently the Quick Response codes shifted from being used primarily for tracking vehicles in manufacturing to being present in our everyday lives, from magazines and billboards, to subway stations, and even condom packaging.

In June 2011, 14 million U.S. smartphone users scanned a QR code. Impressive, right? Not so much when you look at the fact that, at the end of July, 82.2 million Americans owned smartphones. That’s only 17 percent of smartphone users scanning a QR code. But how many actually used QR codes on a regular basis? How many have actually scanned more than once? How many still have the app on their phone that lets them scan the code?

Out of those that still scan repeatedly, only half “sometimes” feel they have received something of value for their efforts. So at the end of the day, what’s the point?

So the big question is: what’s wrong with QR codes? I think it breaks down simply into two main issues. Read more…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>